human dynamics Archive

  • Community Development Tip – August 2014 In any situation, it is always good to start from where the other person is at in relation to any particular topic or issue. So in cross cultural situations this is all the more important. Of course many people will ask, “How […]

    Start from where people are at

    Community Development Tip – August 2014 In any situation, it is always good to start from where the other person is at in relation to any particular topic or issue. So in cross cultural situations this is all the more important. Of course many people will ask, “How […]

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  • This is a short video exploring the confusion between the knowledge systems and worldview of Yolŋu culture and the dominant culture of mainstream Australia, and the devastating impacts this confusion has on Yolŋu people. Dharaŋanawuy – a Yolŋu word meaning deep mutual respect and understanding, […]

    Dharaŋanawuy – deep mutual respect and understanding

    This is a short video exploring the confusion between the knowledge systems and worldview of Yolŋu culture and the dominant culture of mainstream Australia, and the devastating impacts this confusion has on Yolŋu people. Dharaŋanawuy – a Yolŋu word meaning deep mutual respect and understanding, […]

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  • Personnel in communities who put  people centered processes before policy, bureaucratic expectations, and achievement, have better local engagement, and mobilise change in the long term.  The flip side is, the impact of such people seems to fade before the devastation created by "the system".

    Why the Government Can’t Succeed, But You Can!

    Personnel in communities who put people centered processes before policy, bureaucratic expectations, and achievement, have better local engagement, and mobilise change in the long term. The flip side is, the impact of such people seems to fade before the devastation created by "the system".

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  • It seems strange when you think about it. While well funded and well resourced dominant culture personnel come and go to Aboriginal communities, the not so well resourced AHED/Why Warriors workers stick in there. Why? Is it because of the relationships our team build on […]

    The Dangerous and Costly Intercultural Grey Zone

    It seems strange when you think about it. While well funded and well resourced dominant culture personnel come and go to Aboriginal communities, the not so well resourced AHED/Why Warriors workers stick in there. Why? Is it because of the relationships our team build on […]

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  • Cross-cultural training is a difficult subject to talk about due to a whole range of factors. One of the main factors is that many dominant culture and Aboriginal people now carry psychological scars or defensive attitudes that have become an entrenched natural part of their […]

    What is good cross-cultural training?

    Cross-cultural training is a difficult subject to talk about due to a whole range of factors. One of the main factors is that many dominant culture and Aboriginal people now carry psychological scars or defensive attitudes that have become an entrenched natural part of their […]

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  •   Richard Trudgen, author of Why Warriors Lie Down and Die, responds to media coverage of recent violence in NT communities: Richard Trudgen, author of Why Warriors Lie Down and Die, responds to the ABC news on the recent violence and crime in the NT […]

    Responding to Violence in the NT: the usual ‘get tough approach’, or a different way forward?

      Richard Trudgen, author of Why Warriors Lie Down and Die, responds to media coverage of recent violence in NT communities: Richard Trudgen, author of Why Warriors Lie Down and Die, responds to the ABC news on the recent violence and crime in the NT […]

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  • I have mentioned to some people that there is a test online that allows us to test our unconscious racial associations or prejudices.  It is called an Implicit Association Test and it can be found at implicit.harvard.edu All of us carry with us unconscious associations […]

    Our hidden biases. Test your unconscious racial associations.

    I have mentioned to some people that there is a test online that allows us to test our unconscious racial associations or prejudices.  It is called an Implicit Association Test and it can be found at implicit.harvard.edu All of us carry with us unconscious associations […]

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  • Having moved to a remote Indigenous community about 4 months ago, my wife and I have recently started to go through the struggles of culture shock. In this article I take you through some of the causes, the symptoms and how to manage Culture Shock.  The essential basics of surviving what can be the most difficult part of working in an remote Aborignal or Torres Strait Islander community in the first year.

    Culture Shock 101

    Having moved to a remote Indigenous community about 4 months ago, my wife and I have recently started to go through the struggles of culture shock. In this article I take you through some of the causes, the symptoms and how to manage Culture Shock. The essential basics of surviving what can be the most difficult part of working in an remote Aborignal or Torres Strait Islander community in the first year.

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  • It is the easiest thing to lay blame.  It is also very easy to assume that you are being blamed by someone else.  Recently, I have become more aware of the way groups all working to help Indigenous people fight against each other, laying blame or putting up walls.  The clash of cultures that occurs within and among organisations working with Indigenous can result in what I call the 'blame game'.   A dynamic that brings added stress and disfunction to the whole system.  The blame game is notable both between dominant culture workers and Indigneous people, as well as between different Indigneous groups.

    The Blame Game.

    It is the easiest thing to lay blame. It is also very easy to assume that you are being blamed by someone else. Recently, I have become more aware of the way groups all working to help Indigenous people fight against each other, laying blame or putting up walls. The clash of cultures that occurs within and among organisations working with Indigenous can result in what I call the 'blame game'. A dynamic that brings added stress and disfunction to the whole system. The blame game is notable both between dominant culture workers and Indigneous people, as well as between different Indigneous groups.

    Continue Reading...