Aboriginal organisations Archive

  •   Community Development Tip – March 2015 Different Ways of Communicating Question: “How do I work with limited eye contact and little obvious response from Aboriginal clients? Also, do we talk too much?” Have you ever sat down and talked to a person with a […]

    The Lights are On But Nobody is Home

      Community Development Tip – March 2015 Different Ways of Communicating Question: “How do I work with limited eye contact and little obvious response from Aboriginal clients? Also, do we talk too much?” Have you ever sat down and talked to a person with a […]

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  • The AHED Project (the not for profit arm of Why Warriors) held its first conference on 24th May 2014 in Melbourne in collaboration with Manna Gum, TEAR Australia, Surrender, Essendon Baptist Church and Tabor College, titled: Future Dreaming: Purpose, Passion & Power in Remote Indigenous Communities […]

    Future Dreaming Conference: Session 1

    The AHED Project (the not for profit arm of Why Warriors) held its first conference on 24th May 2014 in Melbourne in collaboration with Manna Gum, TEAR Australia, Surrender, Essendon Baptist Church and Tabor College, titled: Future Dreaming: Purpose, Passion & Power in Remote Indigenous Communities […]

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  • The first ever Yolŋu Nations Assembly (YNA) was held from 14th-17th October in Galiwin’ku, bringing together clan leaders from across Arnhem Land. Below is a letter of thanks from Yolŋu leaders to those who supported the gathering. 31st October 2011 Dear Supporters, On behalf of Yolŋu Nations Assembly […]

    First Yolngu Nations Assembly held in Galiwin’ku

    The first ever Yolŋu Nations Assembly (YNA) was held from 14th-17th October in Galiwin’ku, bringing together clan leaders from across Arnhem Land. Below is a letter of thanks from Yolŋu leaders to those who supported the gathering. 31st October 2011 Dear Supporters, On behalf of Yolŋu Nations Assembly […]

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  • In the previous article I discussed some of the historical influences on the economy in the remote Indigenous communities of Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory.  Briefly, it shows that Indigenous people have been moved from a position of traditional economic independence to a situation […]

    Economics of Remote Aboriginal Communities Part 2 – Today’s Economy.

    In the previous article I discussed some of the historical influences on the economy in the remote Indigenous communities of Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory.  Briefly, it shows that Indigenous people have been moved from a position of traditional economic independence to a situation […]

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  • It is the easiest thing to lay blame.  It is also very easy to assume that you are being blamed by someone else.  Recently, I have become more aware of the way groups all working to help Indigenous people fight against each other, laying blame or putting up walls.  The clash of cultures that occurs within and among organisations working with Indigenous can result in what I call the 'blame game'.   A dynamic that brings added stress and disfunction to the whole system.  The blame game is notable both between dominant culture workers and Indigneous people, as well as between different Indigneous groups.

    The Blame Game.

    It is the easiest thing to lay blame. It is also very easy to assume that you are being blamed by someone else. Recently, I have become more aware of the way groups all working to help Indigenous people fight against each other, laying blame or putting up walls. The clash of cultures that occurs within and among organisations working with Indigenous can result in what I call the 'blame game'. A dynamic that brings added stress and disfunction to the whole system. The blame game is notable both between dominant culture workers and Indigneous people, as well as between different Indigneous groups.

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